7.26.2013

rereading is the best reading



"I've always thought the best reading is rereading." - Gretchen Rubin

I've given up a lot of media time this year to replace with reading, and I have more to spare. When I was little, until I was in my teens, I could always be found most likely doing one of three things -- playing outside, drawing, or reading. Most of my sweetest childhood memories take place outside, I passed hours upon hours with pencils and paper, and I still remember books that I adored when I was 10, 11, or 12 years old. My mother made sure we grew up with good books and I was always devouring something new. I loved E.B. White, Roald Dahl, and Laura Ingalls Wilder. Caddie Woodlawn, Where the Red Fern Grows, Julie of the Wolves, and the Misty of Chincoteague books. Classics like Pinocchio, Black Beauty, and Through the Looking Glass. As I tumultuously slipped into my teens, my books of choice went from classic children's literature to Christian romance and Christian mystery romance (yes, that genre exists); however, I grew tired of cheap books pretty quickly and made my way over to Christian non-fiction like Donald Miller and Rob Bell, who remain some of my favorite authors. Most of my reading since becoming a mother has revolved around parenting, psychology, and memoirs. I've recently discovered a new genre I adore -- travel and food!

I've read so many amazing books that made a lasting impression on me and have always known that someday I would reread my favorites. I never found the "perfect" time to do this, because I have so many books on my list already (112, to be exact), covering genres ranging from birth and parenting to psychology, classic literature, theology, and memoirs. Often I think, so many books, so little time. I love to read, which is why I've cut my computer time practically in half; I want to be able to read books that interest me, and rereading books has felt like a waste of time.

I always finish a book unless I absolutely hate it, but I have made the resolution to stop doing that. If I'm not into a book, I don't have to force myself to finish it. My grandpa's rule is to give a book the first 100 pages. If you still don't like it after that, don't finish it. Even C.S. Lewis said he skimmed some parts of books! (Does anyone know or remember in what book of his this was mentioned?! I know he wrote about it and it's killing me that I can't remember. In case I haven't been clear in the past, I freakin' love C.S. Lewis. I don't get star struck very often, [except upon meeting Aaron Marsh] but you better believe if it was possible to meet this great man, I would be speechless and giddy.) The last book I forced myself through was My Sister's Keeper. I wanted to love it, but I have come to conclusion after reading two of Jodi Picoult's books that I cannot stand her writing style. I admit I skipped about 30% of it and think that I would have been left more satisfied by simply seeing the movie.

I've created a list of books I absolutely loved that I must reread in the very near future. I've begun A Wrinkle in Time this afternoon, and each word is like being swept back to my childhood. I can't believe I remember so many details. There is something so comforting in reading a book you loved as a child!

My Re-Read List
A Wrinkle in Time
Where the Red Fern Grows (although, I read this book 3 times when I was a kid)
A Little Princess (this, I must have read 7 or 8 times)
Julie of the Wolves
Anne of Green Gables
Caddie Woodlawn
To Kill a Mockingbird
Jane Eyre 
A Million Miles in a Thousand Years
Sex God
Velvet Elvis
Blue Like Jazz
The Irresistible Revolution
Mere Christianity
Through Painted Deserts
To Own a Dragon (now re-titled Father Fiction with four new chapters, so I may read the new version)
The entire Harry Potter series
The first three books of the Chronicles of Narnia (never got past the third!)

2 comments:

  1. Here is one to read for the first time. It is an amazing bit of writing. "The Wise Woman" by George MacDonald. http://openlibrary.org/books/OL7189790M/The_wise_woman

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh! He wrote At the Back of the North Wind... I began reading that when I was 14 and never finished. I will add The Wise Woman to my reading list. Thanks for the suggestion!

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails